Hamilton Grange National Memorial

Address 414 West 141st Street
New York, NY 10005
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Themes Revolutionary War
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Hamilton Grange National Memorial preserves the home of founding father Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton was commissioned as a Captain of Artillery at the beginning of the Revolutionary War; and later his abilities were again recognized and he was invited to become an aide-de-camp to General George Washington. After the war, as a member of Congress, Hamilton was instrumental in creating the new Constitution. As co-author of the Federalist Papers, he was indispensable in the effort to get the Constitution adopted. As the first Secretary of the Treasury (1789-95), he devised plans for funding the national debt, securing federal credit, encouraging expansion of manufacturing, and organizing the federal bank. As an integral member of Washington's cabinet, he developed the concept of "implied powers," which allowed the federal government to do things in support of the Constitution, that were not specifically spelled out in it. Hamilton commissioned architect John McComb, Jr. to design a Federal-style country home on a 32-acre estate in upper Manhattan. This house was completed in 1802 and named "The Grange" after his father's ancestral home in Scotland. However on July 11, 1804, Hamilton was fatally wounded in a duel with his personal and political rival Vice President Aaron Burr. The house was moved to St. Nicholas Park.

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